Monthly Archives: June 2011

In his dreams: Curtis Bathurst’s Leon the Orchid Hunter HuCard art

Seattle-based artist Curtis Bathurst (he does contract work for a number of area game companies) recently said on his blog (and on Flickr) that two of his favorite things are Leon the Orchid Hunter and PC-Engine HuCards. In an attempt to combine those two loves, Bathurst produced the following illustration.

To see more of Bathurst’s stuff, check out his blog, actualpinecone.com, and/or his Flickr photostream.

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Wait, when did all of these PC Cocoron screenshots hit the web?

Like any PC Engine fan worth his or her salt, I’ve long had a fascination with that most mysterious of unreleased titles, Takeru’s PC Cocoron.

Until this past weekend, though, I was under the impression that the screenshots included in the magazine scan below were all that were released of this remake/sequel/whatever of a Famicom game with a similar name.

While reading videogameden.com’s review of the above-mentioned Famicom title, though, I noticed the following screenshot-filled magazine scan.

After a bit of Googling, I came across even more screenshots of this criminally-unreleased game at this site.

These scans and screens have been on the web for some time now, haven’t they? I don’t suppose this means copies of said game have been floating around the web for a while now, too?

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Speaking of rare PC Engine hardware, what happened to this monitor?

Did you know that the folks at NEC announced both the PC Engine DUO and the PC Engine LT (the laptop-esque portable mentioned in this post) at the Tokyo Game Show in 1991? Well, they did.

At the same event, NEC also displayed a four-inch, clamshell monitor that could be attached to the aforementioned DUO to turn it into what the writers at TurboPlay magazine called “the ultimate portable machine.”

In this article (from the August/September 1991 issue of TurboPlay), it’s suggested that the monitor, below, had been released two years prior with a price tag of approximately $600. That assertion seems questionable to me, as that would mean it was released in 1989–the PC Engine’s second year on the market.


So, I have a question for any fellow PC Engine fans out there who may come across this post: Was this monitor really released in Japan in 1989, or was it released alongside the DUO and the LT?

Regardless, it’s a rather fascinating peripheral–especially given its release date–isn’t it?

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