Tag Archives: scans

Wait, when did all of these PC Cocoron screenshots hit the web?

Like any PC Engine fan worth his or her salt, I’ve long had a fascination with that most mysterious of unreleased titles, Takeru’s PC Cocoron.

Until this past weekend, though, I was under the impression that the screenshots included in the magazine scan below were all that were released of this remake/sequel/whatever of a Famicom game with a similar name.

While reading videogameden.com’s review of the above-mentioned Famicom title, though, I noticed the following screenshot-filled magazine scan.

After a bit of Googling, I came across even more screenshots of this criminally-unreleased game at this site.

These scans and screens have been on the web for some time now, haven’t they? I don’t suppose this means copies of said game have been floating around the web for a while now, too?

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

My last Monster Lair post (for the foreseeable future), I swear …

Here’s something I didn’t know about Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair before my copy of the game arrived a few days ago: In lieu of a traditional instructional manual, it comes with a 10-inch-by-14-inch piece of paper that’s been folded into a square.

The front side of said piece of paper is a poster:

The back side, on the other hand, contains all of the instructional stuff:

Click on either of the images above to get a better look at them.

8 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

20,000 screens of overhead maps, eh?

A few weeks ago, I posted the article–pulled from an old issue of Super Gaming magazine–that served as my introduction to Tengai Makyo II: Manjimaru. Today I’m posting the article–pulled from an old issue of Turbo Play magazine–that solidified my obsession with the titular Manjimaru and his magnanimous team.

I’m pretty sure the following sentence was the one that grabbed me by the short and curlies, so to speak: “In the course of the game, you will cover over 20,000 screens of overhead maps, fight 300 types of enemies and 48 boss characters, enjoy more than 90 minutes of incredible animation, listen to three hours of speech [and] hear 24 CD music tracks and over 80 different PSG (machine generated) music tracks.”

See also:My introduction to Tengai Makyo II

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Forgotten treasures

My husband and I spent the last week and a half at my parents’ house in McFarland, Wis. While we were there, I dug through my old bedroom closet–and discovered a slew of video games, systems and magazines that I had somehow forgotten.

Among the treasures I unearthed: A pristine copy of Final Match Tennis, two TTi promo videos (one focuses on Lords of Thunder, while the other touts the Turbo Duo system and software in general) and four PC Engine Fan magazine inserts (including some sort of Dragon Knight II strategy guide, see below).

I’ll probably share scans of some of the PC Engine Fan inserts in the coming days and weeks–along with other odds and ends, of course.

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

So, how close was Astralius to coming to the States?

While reading two reviews (one at thebrothersduomazov.com and another at unlimitedzigworks.com) of the much-maligned Astralius over the weekend, I remembered that, once upon a time, the game was supposed to see a North American release.

In fact, the title was shown off at both the winter and summer Consumer Electronics Shows that were held in 1991.

Following the former, the editors of TurboPlay magazine waxed poetic (in their February/March 1991 issue, see below) about Astralius, writing that it would “give both Y’s games a serious run for the top honor” and “should prove to be one of the toughest games made as well.”

Following the latter, TurboPlay‘s editors promised (in their August/September 1991 issue) that the title would hit the streets stateside “by Christmas.” Of course, a few sentences later they shared that developer IGS was “working the bugs out of its attempts to translate this RPG to the TurboGrafx-16.” (Click on the two scans below to read the rest of what they had to say about the title.)

I’m guessing the folks at IGS never quite eradicated said bugs–or, by the time they did, releasing the game no longer made sense economically (or otherwise)?

7 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

‘An ancient tower. A hostile land. A deadly secret.’

The following ad–for Working Designs’ Exile: Wicked Phenomenon–appeared in a number of issues of TurboPlay magazine in the early 1990s.

Turbo fans whose memories have yet to fail them will recall that the image also appeared on the cover of said game, which was released in North America 1993.

Anyway, it’s a love-it-or-hate-it piece of art among gamers–a fact not lost on Working Designs’ Victor Ireland, who at some point told the folks at Hardcare Gaming 101:

“The Exile 2 cover is polarizing. People love it or hate it. It’s basically aping a style of diorama that was really popular to advertise games in Japan. NCS/MASAYA did quite a bit of it, and I wanted to bring that to the US as well. So, I chose Exile 2 as the game to try this on.

“When we ran the ad, EGM or Gamepro (I can’t remember) sent us a survey they did months later with their readers that had that ad listed as the ‘most remembered’ ad from the whole magazine, which, I think, justified the experiment. We tried it again for Vasteel, but the results weren’t that great, so we only used part of one of the space scenes on the back cover of the jewel case.”

Personally, I think the image is pretty cool. It’s certainly more interesting than most of the dreck that was passed off as TurboGrafx-16 cover “art” back in the day.

6 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Mizubaku Daibouken = Bubble Bobble 4?

At least, that’s what the editors of TurboPlay magazine suggested all the way back in 1992–just before Taito’s Mizubaku Diabouken (aka Liquid Kids) hit the streets in Japan.

My initial reaction to that suggestion was something along the lines of “nuh uh!”–but after giving it some consideration my reaction has softened a bit.

After all, the series’ other (actual) entries–Bubble Bobble, Rainbow Islands and Parasol Stars–don’t share enemies, protagonists, settings or weapons, so why would part four–with its waterbomb-wielding platypus–be any different?

All that said, Mizubaku Daibouken isn’t, as far as I can tell, officially called chapter four of the Bubble Bobble saga–although I suppose that may have been something the game’s creators considered early on.

5 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized